The Treasury of Lives

བོད་དང་ཨེ་ཤ་ཡ་ནང་མ་ཧི་མ་ལ་ཡའི་ས་ཁུལ་བཆས་ཀྱི་རྣམ་ཐར་ཀུན་བཏུས།

རྨན་ཐར་གསར་པ།

ཉེ་ཆར་གྱི་འཚོལ་ཞིབ།

Gelok Menpa, an epithet which means “Doctor from Golok,” was a twentieth-century Tibetan doctor who was active in the Amdo region of Tibet. He was trained at Labrang and served as the personal physician to the Fifth Jamyang Zhepa, as well as serving in various Chinese medical organizations

 

Lotsāwa Pakpa Sherab was an eleventh-century translator from Ladakh who studied Buddhism in Kashmir, Tibet, and Nepal. He is credited with dozens of translations in the Kangyur and Tengyur, mostly of tantric materials relating to Vaiśravaṇa, Vajrapāṇi, and Cakrasaṃvara, and is known for spreading Buddhism in Ladakh, where is said to have established Phuktal and Karsha monasteries. He was one of the first renovators of the Jokhang Temple in Lhasa during the later propagation era. According to Ladakhi tradition, he engaged in a feud with Ra Lotsāwa, who was empowered by Vajrabhairava. Their conflict ended in Lotsāwa Pakpa Sherab's death. 

Tsultrim Nyima was a Ladhaki trader who ordained later in life and established Rizong and Samstanling monasteries.

Kachen Lobzang Tsondru was a Ladakhi teacher based at Diskit Monastery. He trained at Tashilhunpo.

Lhalung Gyeltsen Tarchin served as the Nechung Oracle, the state oracle of Tibet, in the early twentieth century. From a young age, he was immersed in the rituals of Nechung under the tutelage of his uncle, Shākya Yarpel, the eleventh Nechung Oracle. His formal religious education was at Drepung Deyang Dratsang. He was dismissed from his post following an investigation into the management of funds at Nechung. Although he was invited to return to his position, he declined and started a family, taking over the estates of the Drumpa family. He was known as a highly learned and pious man who embraced teachings of a variety of traditions. By 1962 he was imprisoned in a Chinese labor camp. Refusing to give a false confession, he remained in detention and died in the early 1960s.